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Best Companies for Working Parents, the Meghan Markle Effect: Broadsheet for Nov. 28


Good morning, Broadsheet readers! The former Posh Spice raises a round for her fashion line, British brands are already excited for the “Meghan Markle effect,” and Fortune reveals our new list of the 50 Best Companies for Working Parents. Enjoy your Tuesday.

EVERYONE’S TALKING

• What works at Workday. Fortune released our list of the 50 Best Companies for Working Parents this morning. The ranking is compiled based on employee feedback—with a particular focus on how parents rate their workplace compared to their colleagues without kids. Also factored in: the availability and generosity of maternity and paternity leave programs, adoption support and childcare programs, as well as access to flexible work options.

This year’s No. 1 is Workday, the California provider of cloud-based HR and finance applications. The company offers 100 days of fully-paid maternity leave and 60 days of paid paternity leave. Workday’s adoptive parents also get 60 days—though not fully-paid—and part-timers get all the same parental benefits as their FT colleagues. Rounding out our top 10:

2. Ultimate Sofware
3. Deloitte
4. Comcast NBCUniversal
5. Salesforce
6. Edward Jones
7. Cooley
8. SAP America
9. Kimley-Horn
10. Wegmans Food Markets

To see the full list, click here: Fortune

ALSO IN THE HEADLINES

• Gabbing with Girlboss. Last week, I had the pleasure of appearing on Sophia Amoruso’s podcast, Girlboss Radio. Sophia and I discussed the career advice I wish someone would have given to me, the importance of covering news that matters to women, the rise of female entrepreneurship, and—of course—The Broadsheet. Check out the full episode here: GirlBoss

• Posh round. Victoria Beckham has raised 30 million pounds ($40 million) to expand the stores and e-commerce channel that carry her namesake fashion brand via a new funding round from NEO Investment Partners. The deal values the business at 100 million pounds ($133.4 million). Fortune

• Do as I say, not as I do? Ivanka Trump is leading a U.S. delegation to southern India this week to promote female entrepreneur­ship and economic power. But the visit raises an uncomfortable question for the first daughter: “What are the work conditions for laborers in India who have pieced together clothes for her fashion line?” Washington Post

• Markle goes Midas. Consulting firm Brand Finance says that the “Kate effect”—the boost a brand gets when it’s worn or used by Kate Middleton—was was worth 152 million pounds in 2015. Now that Meghan Markle and Prince Harry are officially engaged, the company is projecting that Markle will have a similar “midas touch.” Fortune

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

• No diagnosis. Harvey Weinstein and Kevin Spacey are among the latest wave of sexual harassment and assault offenders who have said they are seeking professional help for their behavior. But, according to this New York Times story, no “standard treatment” for perpetrators of sexual offenses exist, and “even the notion of ‘sexual addiction’ as a stand-alone diagnosis is in dispute.” New York Times

• Watch her run. Cosmo profiles Stacey Abrams, who, if elected governor of Georgia next year, would be America’s first-ever African-American woman governor. Cosmopolitan

• Ghosting ghost guns? The Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, part of the gun safety group founded by former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, is attempting to shut down websites that sell the materials to build untraceable homemade guns, known as “ghost guns.” New York Times

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ON MY RADAR

Macron to make “gender-based” insults a legal offense in France Women in the World

Taylor Swift’s Reputation is no. 1 again, but will it maintain its momentum?  New York Times

Pinups in a post-Weinstein world New York Times

‘Complicit’ is Dictionary.com’s word of the year Fortune

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