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Prologo Scratch 2 CPC PAS saddle review

Cycling Weekly

With Prologo deploying its saddle tech armoury on this saddle, it's comfortable and functional


Saddles are a very personal contact point, and it’s hard to pin point the ‘very best’. However, there are a few that we’ve found suit the vast majority of testers. The Prologo Scratch 2 CPC PAS saddle is a road going option with some of the brand’s top tech thrown in – and we found it to be very comfortable, hence it’s an Editor’s Choice 2017 winner… 

The Prologo Scratch 2 CPC PAS saddle has seen a lot of the company’s best technology employed.

The saddle has a rounded profile, which suited our tester’s sitbones well, even in its more standard versions. The Prologo Scratch 2 CPC PAS saddle is available in 134mm and 143mm widths – to suit a wider range of riders.

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First up on the tech list is the CPC. Standing for Connect Power Control, this is a Prologo exclusive design made up of sections of material containing a series of small hollow centred cooling tower-shaped protuberances – the matt black parts of the saddle top.

These grip the surface of your shorts and keep you from slipping around as you pedal. We definitely found that they helped us to keep a strong position on climbs and harder pushes, but they weren’t uncomfortable.

The Scratch 2 CPC PAS saddle gets a central cut-out and anti-slip tech Cycling Weekly

PAS stands for Perineal Area System. It’s the central pressure relief groove on the saddle top – a more standard option found on other makers’ saddles too. The groove stretches a long way down the saddle’s surface, with its front end a couple of inches behind the saddle’s nose.

Not everyone gets along with cut-outs and grooves on saddles, but the Prologo PAS groove is not noticeable when riding and doesn’t detract from saddle comfort.

This perch features an Ergo Shape Design, giving a sloping cross-sectional profile to the central portion to allow a better cycling position.

Prologo uses three different foam densities in the saddle’s top. The rear of the saddle, which carries most of a rider’s weight has high density foam for stability. The middle of the saddle is made of less dense foam for reduced pressure on the pelvis, while the front uses lower density foam still to protect the sensitive soft tissue.

The test Prologo Scratch 2 saddle sits on alloy-steel Tirox rails, which helps to explain its quite high weight of 234g. There’s a version with Nack carbon fibre rails available too for reduced weight, claimed to be 185g, but with a price £75 higher at £250.